CFPB Forces TransUnion and Equifax to Return $17.6 million to Customers

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau strikes again!

When the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau was created in 2011, its whole goal was to help the American consumer.

In July 2010, Congress passed and President Obama signed the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. The Act created the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). The CFPB consolidates most Federal consumer financial protection authority in one place. The consumer bureau is focused on one goal: watching out for American consumers in the market for consumer financial products and services.

It seems to be doing it’s job. From helping Wells Fargo customers and military families to pawn shop consumers. Now, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is helping TransUnion and Equifax customers:

Equifax, Inc., TransUnion, and their subsidiaries for deceiving consumers about the usefulness and actual cost of credit scores they sold to consumers. The companies also lured consumers into costly recurring payments for credit-related products with false promises. The CFPB ordered TransUnion and Equifax to truthfully represent the value of the credit scores they provide and the cost of obtaining those credit scores and other services.

It’s good to know that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is on the job.

 

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National Consumer Protection Week

A few months ago, I wrote about the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and their work to help average Americans. Well, this week is National Consumer Protection Week! I thought I’d help get the word out, so here it is:

In case you forgot what the CFPB does, the website says:

We’re taking your complaints. We started with credit cards, moved on to mortgages, and now have the ability to take your complaints about a wide range of financial products and services provided by banks and credit unions.

We launched our supervision program. We are responsible for supervising not just banks, but also other financial businesses, such as payday lenders, mortgage companies, private student lenders, and others – collectively known as nonbanks. We will visit these businesses to make sure they are following the law and assess risks to consumers.

We adopted a rule to increase protections for consumers who transfer money internationally. One of our jobs is to write rules that tell financial institutions how to follow the law. This regulation will help protect consumers who send money electronically to another country.

We’re developing tools to help you make better financial decisions. Our Student Debt Repayment Assistant helps people with student loans determine their repayment options. We’re also working to provide educational materials to service providers working directly with consumers in their communities. Nearly 5,200 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) locations around the country received materials from us that they can use to help encourage taxpayers to save some of their 2011 federal income tax refunds.

We’re looking out for you. All finance is personal, but some populations have unique needs. Staff from our offices for older Americans, servicemembers, and students are out in the field gathering information and looking out for consumers’ interests.

Tell a friend!