$500 Scholarship from Home Depot for Construction Trade Programs

From EC&M:

The Home Depot, Atlanta, recently established its first-ever trade scholarship program. Through the program, the company will award more than 600 students enrolled in building and construction trade programs $500 to help offset the cost of tuition, fees, books, and supplies. In total, more than $300,000 in scholarships will be awarded to support the future leaders of the building and construction industries this fall.

The Home Depot trade scholarship program is open to students nationwide currently enrolled in a building and construction trade school program at a college, university, or accredited educational institution who will be entering into the final year or term of their degree or career program. Winners will be selected based on academic performance, leadership, and work experience. English and Spanish applications are available online at The Home Depot Web site. The application deadline is June 20. Winners will be announced in September.

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How to Give: Tips For Passing on Wealth To Your Kids, Your Charity, and Your Dog

From US News:

In tough economic times when everyone’s focused on keeping what they have, giving freely is still important. Already, charities are feeling the pinch that comes with a severe recession, and many parents are wondering just how much they’ll be able to pass on to their children. Since it’s likely that you’re focused on staying afloat—and working with less money—it’s important to find the most efficient ways to give. With help from Debby Cochran, a lawyer and estate planning specialist at Cochran and Owen in Tysons Corner, Va., U.S. News offers advice on how to make sure your giving goes exactly where you intend with the least amount of hassle:

1. Giving to your children. Everyone wants to provide for their children and luckily, using gifts to transfer wealth is fairly straightforward.

The basics: Giving gifts to your children is a way to distribute your estate without taking a huge tax hit. But it’s important to start early, since there are limits on how much you can pass on each year. If you’re married, a couple can give up to $26,000 tax-free to as many individuals as they’d like each year (the limit is $13,000 for gifts from singles.) Above that limit, gifts are still tax-free but they count against a lifetime gift exemption of $1 million per individual as of 2009. Gifts over that limit can also overlap with estate taxes, and you’ll have to file a Form 709 gift tax return. If you expect to hit that $1 million limit in your lifetime, Cochran says now might be the time for some extra giving, since assets that have fallen heavily in value lately but could later recover are counted at their market price at the time of the gift.

 

 

Consider a loan: Straightforward gifts are great, but for larger amounts, it might be a good time to consider a loan. Right now, low interest rates in general mean rates on inter-family loans are at rock-bottom levels: as little as 2 percent for medium-term loans (three to nine years) with longer-term loans in the still-cheap 3 percent to 4 percent range. Rates are usually set by the Applicable Federal Rate, published monthly by the IRS here. If loans are set at or above those rates, they can be given without incurring incurring gift taxes. If, for example, you son or daughter need a $300,000 loan to by a house, you can lend them the money at the low rate and then forgive the debt tax-free at the gift rates mentioned above. Bottom line: Family loans have a tax advantage and better rates than most banks are offering at the moment. “You can get rid of appreciation tax-free,” Cochran says. As for finding a lender, inter-family loans are available online through “social-lending” sites like Virgin Money for relatively modest fees.

To read the rest of the article visit US News.

$1,000 for Student Volunteers at Conference and Trade Show in Boston

From Boston College Career Center Blog:

Ten $1,000 Student Student volunteers and scholarship applicants are needed for the 84th Annual Conference & Trade Show in Boston, MA, which will take place July 24-28, 2009.  Attending and volunteering at the Annual Conference & Trade Show is an invaluable experience for students to learn from and network with industry professionals.  All students who volunteer will receive full conference registration.  IAAM Foundation Student Scholarships are a great way to further offset trip expenses.  This year up to 10 student scholarships in the amount of $1,000 each will be awarded.

For more information visit IAAM.

Free College for Low Income Washington Students

From HeraldNet:

These are low-income middle schoolers who are guaranteed a full ride to any Washington college if they fill out an application, maintain a 2.0 grade point average and don’t commit a crime before they graduate high school.

Some haven’t applied because they think the deal is too good to be true. Others don’t know about it. And some just haven’t taken the time to fill out the brief application, which includes one question about family income and basic information about the applicant.

Statewide, just 28,000 students have applied since the program began last year.

Many students wrongly believe they need to pay to apply for the scholarship or that it’s some kind of hoax, said Amie Mbye, an eighth-grader at Alderwood Middle School in Lynnwood.

For more information on the College Bound scholarship program or to apply online, go to www.hecb.wa.gov/collegebound.

To read the complete article visit HaroldNet.

Explicit Lyrics

I came across this article about a parent complainng about the music played at an afterschool dance in Virginia and it got me to thinking, “who decides what explicit is and who is supposed to enforce it”?

I remember having my mother talk to me about the lyrics of music I listened to, and setting me straight about a few things, when I was younger. She made it a point to explain what the lyrics meant, how they may be applied to me, and how others might view me as a consequence of me repeating those lyrics. With that upbringing, I went on to work in afterschool during undergrad. I distincly remember students wanting to play music that I didn’t deem “appropriate” for them thought I listened to it myself. The argument was usually something along the lines of:

Student, “I listen to it at home.”

Me, “Then go home and listen to it”

Student, “But my mom knows I listen to it. It’s not a big deal.”

Me, “Great, then listen to it at home. Let’s try something new while we’re here.”

Needless to say, I won out because 1) I wouldn’t budge and 2) I was in charge. After introducing them to music that I deemed “appropriate” for them to listen to, I would drive away listening to the same songs that I didn’t think they should have heard. Am I a hypocrite?

When I heard parents complain about the work that educators do/ enviornment that their child is in, I wonder how many of them are adhearing to the same standards at home. How do the kids know to request those kinds of songs in the first place?

Red Cross Scholarship for Students – Bloodstock 2009

What is Bloodstock?
To help avoid any life-threatening blood shortages, the American Red Cross is kicking off Bloodstock 2009. This is a fun program for you – our dedicated high school and college students. The American Red Cross believes that, with your support, we will be better equipped to meet the blood needs of the patients in our community!

How do you qualify to enter Bloodstock?
Bloodstock 2009 drives will be held between May 1 and August 31, 2009 and December 15, 2009 through January 15, 2009. American Red Cross will have a drawing for scholarships for any student that plans and organizes a successful Bloodstock 2009 blood drive! To qualify for the scholarship drawings, a student must plan and organize a blood drive that collects a minimum of 50 units of blood ($2,000 scholarship) or a drive that collects a minimum of 35 units of blood ($1,000 scholarship) from volunteer donors.